Prevent the Summer Slide with Lexercise

What’s on your family’s calendar for summer? A National Park vacation? Visit to grandma? Swimming lessons?

What about maintaining or improving your child’s reading and spelling skills?

Prevent the Summer Slide

While that may not sound like typical summer vacation fare, Lexercise Basic Therapy makes it easy for students to catch up and keep up. In just two hours a week over the summer, you can help your struggling reader or speller overcome their difficulties and be ready to thrive in the next school year.

You can fit in Basic Therapy sessions whenever your schedule permits, and since it’s online, you can even take it with you. Plus, it can be continued into the school year without disrupting your child’s school schedule.

An online program to improve reading, writing, and spelling for children struggling with dyslexia or a learning disability, here are the basics of Basic Therapy:

  • Working side-by-side with your child, you follow easy, recorded instructions to work through the self-paced online program.
  • Basic Therapy includes lessons and games with visual and audio prompts, plus parent education materials.
  • The content of the lessons covers the basic concepts of the English language – exactly what your child needs to become a competent, consistent, and confident reader and speller.
  • After each lesson, your child completes a series of fun online exercises reinforcing the work you’ve done together.
  • A skilled Lexercise therapist is assigned to each participating family to answer questions and help when needed.

It’s that simple. And it works! Children who complete the Lexercise program improve three grade levels on average. Their reading, spelling, and comprehension improve. They become more confident, fluent readers, and their grades improve.

See what parents of children, just like yours, are saying on our Testimonials Page. And if you have any questions about our programs, or want to learn more about how Basic Therapy works, you can visit our Basic Therapy page, contact us via email at info@lexercise.com or call us at 919-747.4557.

What a great addition to your summer!

Unconventional Summer Learning

How to Correct Your Child Without Discouraging them (33)The summer is drawing to a close and the school year is going to begin again. You don’t want to burn your child out with new information, but you also want to warm up their brains for a new school year.

So what do you do? This would be a great time to explore topics outside of the conventional classroom instruction.

Educational Screen Time: You can do this at your home with channels like PBS or History, but you can also take your child to see a documentary in an IMAX theatre. This makes learning an exciting experience that you can do together. This brings along positive thoughts to a learning experience for your child that may have had difficulty before with learning prior. Some good documentaries that are circulating at IMAX are “A Beautiful Planet” and “National Park Adventure.”

A day at the museum: Kid’s Museums are a great way to get out of the house for an educationally fun day. Not only will kid’s museums teach topics related to the classroom, it will also encourage your child to use their social skills to meet and play with new friends. These museums can assist you in facilitating productive play with your child, skills you can bring home.

pexels-photo-11523Cook together: Have your child read you the recipe steps and help you get the ingredients together. Recipes are less intimidating to read because there aren’t many words, but they may learn some new vocabulary. This will help your child learn patience and how to follow directions. It will also teach them that hard work leads to rewards.

If you suspect your child may have dyslexia or may need some extra reading practice, visit our website here. Our program is a perfect supplement to the start of the new school year.

How to help kids develop a life-long passion for reading

pile of booksAs summer is approaching, now is a great time to think of how you can get your child engaged in reading during summer break. Some of the most powerful and influential time you can spend with your child is reading aloud with them, and summer road trips are the perfect times to captivate your child with the magic of reading.

Long car rides to summer vacation spots can be an extremely valuable time for “reading aloud” to your child via books on tape.  (Turning around and reading to children in the back seat can be both challenging and uncomfortable!)

In the weeks leading up to summer, start thinking ahead about getting some human-read books on tape. Your local library will likely have a section dedicated to this genre of books. Here are a few tips for getting the most out of your summer vacation reading:

  • In choosing what books you plan to listen to, involve your child. If your child is “invested” in the book, he or she will be more attentive from the beginning.
  • But also consider something that will appeal to the whole family, as I highly encourage this to be an interactive, full-family activity.
  • Try finding a book that has a plot that is discussable and thought-provoking.
  • While listening in the car, take time to stop the recording and discuss it, perhaps after every chapter. This will help keep your child engaged and excited for the next chapter!

But, also remember that summer offers more reading opportunities than simply car rides! Summer means longer evenings, more light, and a chance to use those precious summer evenings to accomplish something magical. Set up some family rules for keeping the TV off and the books open. Using the last hour of the day as family read-aloud time is a great idea. Make this your sacred time to cuddle up and enjoy the wonders of reading.

In your preparation for summer reading, I also suggest reading Jim Trelease’s classic, The Read-Aloud Handbook. It exposes the benefits and importance of reading aloud to children and offers proven techniques and strategies for helping children discover the pleasures of reading. Not to mention, the last part of the Read-Aloud Handbook is an anthology of books that are powerful for reading aloud.

For more on reading aloud, see my recent post on shared inquiry.

Lexercise’s online services for struggling readers, writers, and spellers are a motivating blend of high-touch and high-tech. If you have questions or to learn more contact me at Info@Lexercise.com or 1-919-747-4557.